Ancient Egypt



Page by Anneke Bart





Kings and Queens

4th dynasty
Seneferu, Khufu, Khafre, Menkaure, Djedefre, etc.

11th dynasty
Kings named Mentuhotep and Intef

12th dynasty
Amenemhet I - IV,
Senusret I-III


18th dynasty
Amenhotep I-IV,
Tuthmosis I-IV, Akhenaten, Tutankhamen, Aye, Horemheb, etc.


19th dynasty
Sety I-II, Ramesses I-II, Merenptah, Amenmesses, Tawosret.

20th dynasty

Sethnakht, Ramesses III
Ramesses IV - XI




Cleopatra VII Philopator

Queens (D1-6)- Old Kingdom
Queens (D11-13) Middle Kingd.
Queens (D16-20)- New Kingdom
Queens (D21-29)- Late Period




Officials, Priesthood etc.
Viziers (New Kingdom)
High Priests of Amun
God's Wives of Amun
High Priests of Ptah
Viceroys of Nubia
Who's who of New Kingdom


Amarna Period
Akhenaten
Queen Nefertiti
inscriptions Queen Nefertiti.
Queen Kiya

Smenkhare
Tutankhamen
Tombs at Amarna
Houses at Amarna

Tombs:
Valley of the Kings,
Valley of the Queens
Theban Tombs,
Tombs at Abydos
Tombs at El Kab
Tombs in Aswan
Early dynastic Saqqara
New Kingdom Saqqara
The Unis Cemetary

Mastabas at the Giza Plateau
Giza Mastabas 1000 cemetary
Giza Mastaba 2000 cemetary
Giza Mataba 2300 cemetary
Giza Mastaba 4000 cemetary
Giza Mastaba 5000 cemetary
Giza Mastaba 6000 cemetary
Giza Mastaba 7000 cemetary

Mummy Caches
Tomb DB320
Tomb KV35

Viziers

Old Kingdom

Middle Kingdom and 2nd Intermediate Period

18th Dynasty

19th and 20th Dynasty

Southern Viziers of Egypt through the 21st to 25th dynasty

26th Dynasty

Ptolemaic Period


The vizier was the right hand man of the king. An interesting paper about the installation of the Vizier (New Kingdom) can be found here:
The Installation of the Vizier, by R. O. Faulkner The Journal of Egyptian Archaeology © 1955




Old Kingdom

Ankh-Ka  Chancellor during the reign of Den (Udimu). Buried in Saqqara - mastaba no. 3036

Hesyre
(or Hesy). Vizier to the 3rd dynasty king Djoser Netjerykhet. Buried in Saqqara - tomb 2405

Imhotep. The famous Vizier and Architect of the step pyramid. Imhotep may have been the son of the Royal superintendant of works named Kanofer. Imhotep likely lived on into the reign of King Huni.


Snefru - Khufu - Djedefre - Khafre - Menkaure - Shepseskaf


Nefermaat I, Probably son of Snefru. His wife was named Atet (from their tomb in Meidum)
Titles: Priest of Bastet, Hereditary Prince, Guardian of Nekhen, great one of the five at the house of Thoth, etc.
First Vizier of Snefru (A History of Ancient Egypt By Nicolas-Christophe Grimal pg 68)

Prince Kanefer,  Son of Snefru.
Second Vizier of Snefru, continued to serve Khufu. (A History of Ancient Egypt By Nicolas-Christophe Grimal - pg 68)

Hemiunu     Time of Khufu
King’s son of his body, Chief Justice and Vizier, etc. Son of Prince Nefermaat and his wife Itet, and thus grandson of Seneferu and Hetepheres I. Buried in Giza Mastaba 4000. Khufu's second Vizier (A History of Ancient Egypt By Nicolas-Christophe Grimal - pg 68)

Prince Kawab, Son of Khufu. Eldest son and heir of Khufu. Married to Hetepheres II. Died before his father.
Sons: Kaemsekhem, Mindjedef, and possibly Duaenhor. Daughter: Meresankh III.
His son Mindjedef had the titles King’s son of his body, Hereditary prince,Treasurer of the King of Lower Egypt, etc. G 7760. Mindjedef lived from the time of Khufu to the time of Menkaure. Mindjedef's wife was named Khufuaankh.
Grimal states that Kawab never became Vizier. (A History of Ancient Egypt By Nicolas-Christophe Grimal - pg 72)

Nefermaat II Time of Seneferu – Khufu?
Son of Nefertkau I (mother) and grandson of Seneferu.
King’s son, Hereditary prince, Overlord of Nekheb, etc. (Vizier of Khephren.) Tomb G 7060.
His son Sneferukha'ef was Treasurer of the King of Lower Egypt, Herdsman of Apis, etc. during the middle of Dyn. IV to early Dyn. V. He was buried in G 7070.


Prince Minkhaf  
 Temp. Khufu to Khephren.
King’s son of his body, Chief Justice and Vizier (of Khephren), etc. Parents, Khufu and possibly Henutsen. Tomb G 7430+7440.
Kephren's second Vizier (A History of Ancient Egypt By Nicolas-Christophe Grimal - pg 68)

Khufu-khaf I Time of Khufu – Khafre
Son of Khufu and Queen Henutsen. Served as Vizier (probably of Khufu). Some have speculated that Khufu-khaf is Khafre, but this is uncertain. Tomb G 7130 and 7140.
Married to Nefertkau II and possibly the father of Khufukhaf II.
Daughter: king’s daughter [Nefret?]-ka. Sons: Wet-ka, and Iun-ka.

Prince Ankhaf     Time of Sneferu – Khafre
Ankhaf was Vizier under Khafre. Married to a lady called Hetepheres (II) - possibly daughter of Hetepheres I, who is not buried in this mastaba as it only has one burial shaft. Ankhaf and Hetepheres were likely both children of Seneferu, hence they were (half-) brother and sister. Tomb G 7510.

Dua(en)re     Late 4th dynasty
Son of Khafre and Meresankh III. Served as Vizier late in the dynasty under Menkaure.
Buried in Giza Mastaba (stone built) 5110

Babaef, sometime called Khnembaf     Time of Khufu – Shepseskhaf
Overseer of the Works, Vizier under Shepseskaf. (Tomb G5230)
He was probably the son of Duaenre, and thus a grandson of Khafre and Meresankh III. [conflicting info from different sources]

Nikaure,  Temp. Khephren to end of Dyn. IV.
King’s eldest son of his body, Chief Justice and Vizier (probably of Menkaure), etc. Tomb LG 87
Parents: Khephren and Personet (tomb LG 88). Wife: Nikanebti Prophetess of Hathor Mistress-of-the-Sycamore in all her places, and of Neith, etc.

Iunmin, ,Vizier in late 4th dynasty
King's eldest son of his body, Chief Justice and Vizier (of Menkaure), etc. End of Dyn. IV.
Son of Khafre (?), Wife, Khaamerernebti. Tomb LG 92

Nebemakhet, Temp. Khephren to Menkaure
King’s son of his body, Chief Justice and Vizier, etc. a or a little later. Tomb LG 86 (Also owner of
tomb LG 12.) Son of Khafre and Meresankh III.
Wife: Nubhotp, Prophetess of Hathor Mistress-of-the-Sycamore in all her places, etc.

Ankhmare, Son of Khafre, Vizier under Menkaure
King's eldest son of his body, Chief Justice and Vizier (of Menkaure), Treasurer of his father the King of Lower Egypt, etc. End of Dyn. IV.

Seshathotep, Heti



Userkaf - Sahure - Neferirkare - Shepseskare - Neferefre - Niuserre - Menkauhor - Djedkare Izezi - Unas

Sekhemkare, Temp. Khephren to early Dyn. V.
King’s eldest son of his body, Chief Justice and Vizier (probably of Userkaf and SaHure), etc. Tomb LG 89
Son of Khafre and Queen Hekenuhedjet(?). Wife, Khufu[..]et Royal acquaintance.

Werbauba

Washptah named Izi,
An official of the 5th Dynasty, who served both Sahure and Neferirkare. He began in Sahure's reign, but later became the vizier of Egypt under Neferirkare. He was also a well respected architect and the chief justice of the nation.
(The Book of the Pharaohs By Pascal Vernus, Jean Yoyotte, pg 148 )

Minnefer

Sekhemankhptah
Chief Justice and Vizier, etc. Tomb G7152.
Name is also written as Ptah-Sekhem-Ankh.

Ptahhotep I
Vizier under Djedkare Isesi.
(A History of Ancient Egypt By Nicolas-Christophe Grimal - pg 79)

Ankhu, Son of Ptahhotep (not sure if he's the son of Ptahhotep I or II). Also Vizier

Rashepses - Vizier dating to the middle of Djedkare Isesi's reign.

Akhethotep - Vizier under Djedkare Isesi. Father of Ptahhotep II

Ptahhotep II Tshefi - Vizier under Unas. Known as the author of the Maxims of Ptahhotep (a collection of wise sayings). Son of the Vizier Akhethotep. Ptahhotep and Akhethotep were buried tohether in a mastaba in Saqqara. Ptahhotep had two sons named Ptahhotep and Akhethotep. (A History of Ancient Egypt By Nicolas-Christophe Grimal - pg 69)

Akhethotep Hemi
- Vizier under Unas – Mastaba reused; figure erased.

Ihy - Vizier under Unas – Mastaba reused; figure erased

Nyankhba

Iynefert Shanef
, Time of Unis Vizier, Iynefert's tomb is located near that of Mehu, Unis-ankh and Ihy

Ptahshepses, vizier and Niuserre's son-in-law, who rose to the position of zA ni.swt ni Xt.f, built his mastaba tomb in the royal necropolis at Abusir. He was married to Princess Khamerernebty.

Seshem-nefer (III).  Temp. Isesi (early).
King’s son of his body, Chief Justice and Vizier, etc. (Tomb G 5170)
Parents, Seshemnefer (II) and Henutsen (tomb G 5080).
Wife: Hetepheres King’s daughter, Prophetess of Hathor Mistress-of-the-Sycamore and Neith Opener-of-the-Ways, etc.
Son: Seshemnefer

Senedjemib Inti , Time of Djedkare Isesi
His titles include:  overseer of the two chambers of royal regalia, overseer of the armory, overseer of the houses of the king’s children, overseer of the two treasuries, overseer of the six great (law) courts, overseer of the two granaries, overseer of all works of the king, hereditary prince, royal master builder in both houses (Upper and Lower Egypt),  master of secrets of (every) command of the king, royal chamberlain, chief justice and vizier.
Wife: Tjefi.
Sons: 1. Senedjemib, 2 Ny-ankh-menu, 3. Fetek[ti], 4. Senedjemib Mehi, 5. Khnumenti

Senedjemib Mehi, Time of Unis
Titles include: pillar of the knmt-folk, favorite of the king, overseer of the two armories, overseer of the two houses of gold, overseer of (all) royal regalia, overseer of the two granaries, overseer of all works of the king, hereditary prince, royal master builder in both houses (viz. Upper and Lower Egypt), master of secrets of all commands of the king, royal chamberlain, chief justice and vizier.
Son of Senedjemib Inti ( G 2370)
Wife: Khentkaues ([the king’s daughter of ] his [bo]dy, Priestess of Hathor, Mistress of the Sy[camore])
Daughter: Khentkaues. Sons: Senedjemib and Mehi

Khnumenti Time of Teti
Son of Senedjemib Inti, He appears to have carried on his father’s duties under Teti.
His titles include: favorite of the king, favorite of the king in all works of his, overseer of the two workshops, overseer of the two houses of gold, overseer of the two treasuries, overseer of the six great (law) courts, overseer of scribes of royal records, overseer of the two granaries, overseer of all works of the king, hereditary prince, master of secrets of every command of the king, in[spector of priests] of the pyramid “Enduring are the places of the Son of Re Teti”, chief justice and vizier”


Nefer good name Idu   Early Dyn. 6
Chief Justice and Vizier, etc. (tomb G 5550)
Wife, Hemtre Prophetess of Neith Opener-of-the-Ways.

Hesi – Vizier under Teti (maybe Unas?) – figure and name erased from Mastaba.

Neferseshemre / Sheshi – vizier dated to early / mid Teti

Kagemni – Vizier. Son in Law of Teti, Married to Princess Nebtynubkhet Sesheshet
Also High Priest of Re and Stolist of Min
(A History of Ancient Egypt By Nicolas-Christophe Grimal - pg66)

Mehu - Vizier. Wife was Ankhemerire? His son was Hetepka. Mehu was buried in Saqqara and has been dated to the time of Teti. He may have been connected to Kagemni?

Mereruka - Vizier. Son in Law of Teti, Married to Princess Sesheshet Watetkhetor
Also High Priest of Re and Stolist of Min

Ankhmahor / Sesi – Vizier, dated mid Teti to Pepi I
Vizier, Overseer of the Great House, and First under the King. Buried in Saqqara. His tomb is incorrectly known as the tomb of the physicians.

Inumin – Vizier, dated end Teti to Pepi I

Kaaper – Possibly Vizier, dated end Teti to Pepi I

Khentika – Last Vizier under Teti, possibly early Pepy


Iuu (Iww) - Vizier at the end of Pepy I's reign and possibly also under Merenre. Buried in Abydos.
http://www.umich.edu/~kelseydb/Publications/spring2000/abydos.html

Weni the Elder (beautiful name Nefer Nekhet Mery-Ra) At the end of his career he is also listed as Chief Judge and Vizier. Earlier he holds the titles True Governor of Upper Egypt. Known from the famous autobiographical text of Weni the Elder. According to an inscription from Abydos, he was the son of Iuu - the previous Vizier.
http://www.umich.edu/~kelseydb/Publications/spring2000/abydos.html

Djau - Vizier under Pepi II and Merenre. Brother of Queens Ankhesenpepi I and Ankhesenpepi II (who are sometimes called Ankhesenmerire). And hence an uncle of Pepi II and Merenre. Identical to Idi I? (see below)
Idi I - There are likely two Viziers named Idi. One was an uncle of Pepy II and served near the middle of Pepy II's reign.
Idi II - Probably dates to the end of Pepy II's reign.

Shemay Vizier from the time of Neferkauhor (8th dynasty)
Titles: Hereditary Prince, Mayor of the Pyramid City, Chief Justice, Vizier, Keeper of the Royal Archives, Count, Governor of Upper Egypt, Overseer of the Priests.
Married to the King's daughter Nebyet. Shemay's son Idy would be appointed Governor of Upper Egypt (a title earlier held by Shemay himself)
Royal Decrees from the Temple of Min at Coptus, by William C. Hayes The Journal of Egyptian Archaeology © 1946

Idy Son of Shemay and Nebyet. Served Neferkauhor and Neferirkare.
Royal Decrees from the Temple of Min at Coptus, by William C. Hayes The Journal of Egyptian Archaeology © 1946



Middle Kingdom

Eleventh and Twelfth Dynasty


Bebi,
Vizier and Dignitary of the Curtain, time of Mentuhotep II
(A History of Ancient Egypt By Nicolas-Christophe Grimal - pg 155)

Dagi, Vizier (TT 103) High Official, Overseer of the Pyramid, Dignitary of the Curtain, time of Mentuhotep II
(A History of Ancient Egypt By Nicolas-Christophe Grimal - pg 155)

Ipi, Vizier (TT 315) has generally dated to the reign of Mentuhotep II
Description of sarcophagus?
A New Vizier of the Eleventh Dynasty, by Ludlow S. Bull The Journal of Egyptian Archaeology © 1924
(A History of Ancient Egypt By Nicolas-Christophe Grimal - pg 155)

Amenemhat
, Vizier under Mentuhotep IV Nebtawyre. Later takes the throne as Amenemhat I.

Antefoqer
, Vizier under Amenemhat I and Sesostris I Buried in TT 60. Antefoker's image has been excised from the tomb of his mother Senet. Some have speculated that Antefoker may have been impicated in the murder of King Amenemhet I.
(A History of Ancient Egypt By Nicolas-Christophe Grimal - pg 177)

Ahanakht
, Vizier of Sesostris I

Montuhotep, Vizier of Sesostris I

Ameny, Vizier under Amenemhat II

Siese, Vizier under Amenemhat II


Ankhu, Vizier. He was active under Userkare Khendjer in the 13th dynasty. He was vizier under Sobekhotep III and Sobekhotep IV, when the Hyksos invaded Egypt. A vizier Ankhu is known from a Stela in Cairo (CG 20690). The text mentions his wife Mereryet, two sons - the viziers Ressonbe and Iymeru - as well as his son-in-law Upwowethotep (the owner of the stela).
If this Ankhu is identical to the one shown in a statue in Cairo (42034) then Ankhu was the son of another vizier and his mother was named Henwetipu.

Ressoneb - Son of Ankhu. See above

IymeruSon of a Vizier named Ankhu. Known from a Stela in Cairo (CG 20690) and a statuette from Turin (no 1220)

Iymeru II Son of Iymeru (whose title was khrp-wskht). Known from a statue in Heidelberg (no. 274)

Ay Vizier and Mayor of El-Kab, Father of a Vizier named Iymeru (III)

Iymeru III  Son of the Vizier and Mayor of El-Kab Ay

One of these may be the same as Imeru-Neferkare, Vizier to Sobekhotep IV?
For more information: Notes on the Viziers ʿAnkhu and ʾIymeru in the Thirteenth Egyptian Dynasty, by J. V. Beckerath; Journal of Near Eastern Studies © 1958

Yuy Vizier from end of the 13th dynasty? Pit tomb found in Deir el-Bahari.
An Egyptian Bestiary, by Dorothea Arnold The Metropolitan Museum of Art Bulletin © 1995



Statue of a Vizier from the 13th dynasty from the Saint Louis Art Museum.
(No name of this individual is known to me.)



18th Dynasty


Tetinefer ? Listed on digitalegypt as an early 18th dynasty Vizier.

Yuy? Yuy's tomb was found in Western Thebes (1922-1923). Inscribed statues are in the Metropolitan Museum. Listed as an early 18th dynasty vizier. (Hayes, Sceptre of Egypt II) A vase found in Yuy's tomb is mentioned in The Burlington Magazine , Vol. 114, No. 831 (Jun., 1972), pp. 397-404

Ipuy? Mentioned on a walking stick in the Liverpool museum. See Global Egyptian Museum



Hsy aA n nTr=f Jmn-Ra m Jpt-swt nTr Sps m-Xnw psDt jn TAty tp m st .........J-pw-y Spss ??
The one greatly favoured by his god, Amun-Re, [who is] in Ipet-sut (= Karnak), the august god within the Ennead (?).
The Vizier Ipuy (Shepses)

Imhotep from the time of Tuthmosis I
Southern Vizier. It is interesting that Userhet called Neferhabef, High priest of king's ka for king Thutmose I (Temp. Rameses I - Sety I)  mentions the Vizier Imhotep as his ancestor (in TT51). Imhotep was Buried in Queen's Valley 46.
Imhotep was the father of Hapu (Lecture Priest of Amun) and through him grand-father of Hapuseneb who would rise to prominence under Hatshepsut. (A History of Ancient Egypt By Nicolas-Christophe Grimal)

Aakheperreseneb
?
from the time of Tuthmosis II
Southern Vizier. Listed on digitalegypt as a Vizier. Possibly reign of Tuthmosis II.

Hapuseneb from the time of Hatshepsut
Southern Vizier? (TT67) Hapuseneb also served as High priest of Amun under Hatshepsut. He seems to have been one of the great supporters of this Queen. Son of Hapu (Lecture Priest of Amun) and Ahhotep. A shrine at Gebel el Silsile mentione his brother Sa-Amun and his sister Ahmose. The same shrine mentions his sons Djehutjmes-machet, User-pechtj, Aa-cheper-ka-ra-nefer (High Priest at the Mortuary Temple of Thutmosis II), and several daughters. his titles also include: director of all royal work, keeper of the seal of the King of Lower Egypt. See page maintained by Dr. K. Leser

Amethu called Ahmose from the time of Hatshepsut and Tuthmosis III
(Southern Vizier) (TT83). Wife: Ta-amethu. Sons: Neferweben (Vizier), User (Vizier - TT61 and 131), Amenhotep (Overseer of the Magazine of Amun - TT122), Akheperkare (Priest of Monthu - mentioned in TT122), Amenmose (?) (Scribe in the treasury of Amen). Grand-children: Rekhmire (Vizier), son of Neferweben , Merymaet (Second Prophet of Amun), son of Amenhotep.

Neferweben from the time of Tuthmosis III
(Northern Vizier) Son of Amenthu and Ta-amenthu and a brother of the Vizier Amenuser. Neferweben and his wife Bet were the parents of the vizier Rekhmire.
Statue of Neferweben: Three Inscribed Statues in Boston, by Dows Dunham The Journal of Egyptian Archaeology © 1929

Amenuser from the time of Tuthmosis III
(TT61) (also called Useramen or User) Son of Amethu, the previous Vizier, and Ta-amenthu. Married to Tuiu and they had a daughter named Ahmose (3 more daughters and a son). (Amen)User was known to have served his father in his old age.
In Amenuser's second tomb (TT131) the aged Vizier Amethu (User's father) is shown with chamberlain, courtiers and User as a scribe before Tuthmosis III, and a text of the installation of User as co-vizier.
Tomb mentioned in:
The Egyptian Expedition 1925-1926: The Work of the Graphic Section, by A. M. Lythgoe; N. de Garis Davies
The Metropolitan Museum of Art Bulletin © 1926


Rekhmire from the time of Tuthmosis III and Amenhotep II
(TT100) Son of Vizier Neferweben and his wife Bet. Married to Meryt and father of sons Menkeperreseneb, Amenhotep, Senusert, Mery, Neferweben and possibly Baki.

Amenemipet called Pairy  from the time of Amenhotep II and Tuthmosis IV
(TT29) (southern Vizier) Son of Ahmose-Humay (TT224) and Nub
He was married to the lady Weretmaetef and had a son named Paser. His brother Sennefer (TT96) and his wife Sentnay are shown in the tomb. Likely buried in KV48.
A watercolor palette made of boxwood seems to have been found in TT29? Recent Additions to the Egyptian Collection, by William C. Hayes
The Metropolitan Museum of Art Bulletin © 1948


Tuthmose from the time of Tuthmosis IV
(Northern Vizier) Possibly same as the Vizier who served under Amenhotep III. (see below).

Seny? from the time of Tuthmosis IV
(Southern Vizier?) Listed on the website at Digitalegypt (London College)

Hepu from the time of Tuthmosis IV
(Southern Vizier) Depicted on a funerary cone from Thebes. Buried in TT66. His wife was named Rennai.
His tomb has been discussed in The Reign of Thutmose IV by Betsy M. Bryan.

Tuthmose  from the time of Amenhotep III
Northern Vizier Tuthmose is known to have been the father of the High Priest of Ptah in Memphis by the name of Ptahmose. Tuthmose's wife was named Tawy. Another son of Tuthmose was named Meryptah, who was a prophet and treasurer of the temple of Nebmaatre (Amenhotep III).
The Memphite Stela of Merptaḥ and Ptaḥmosĕ, by Kate Bosse-Griffiths The Journal of Egyptian Archaeology © 1955

Amenhotep named Huy  from the time of Amenhotep III
Northern Vizier This high official was likely buried at Saqqara. Aldred mentions that this Vizier died in year 35 of Amenhotep III. Amenhotep would have overlapped some with the Vizier Ramose (of the South) who is known to have been in office in year 30 of Amenhotep III. Known from inscriptions in Silsileh
See: Amenophis III's vizier Amenhotep at Silsilah East, by Ricardo A. Caminos The Journal of Egyptian Archaeology © 1987
Who Was the Southern Vizier during the Last Part of the Reign of Amenhotep III?, by Andrew Gordon Journal of Near Eastern Studies © 1989

Ptahmose from the time of Amenhotep III
Vizier of the South, High Priest of Amen, Mayor of Thebes, Overseer of all the works, Overseer of all the Priests of Upper and Lower Egypt, Fan-bearer on the right side of the king. Served during the early part of the reign of Amenhotep III . (Redford thinks he served during the latter part of the reign.) Ptahmose is also known from a stela now in the museum in Lyon.
Ptahmose is shown with his wife Apeny (Aypy),  his sons Thutmosis (High priest of Horus) and Huy (met jeugdlok) as well as his daughters Nefertari, Mutemwia, Hemetnetjer, Mutnofret and another daughter  named Nefertari.
See:
Varille A. Une stèle du vizir Ptahmes, contemporain d'Aménophis III (n° 88 du Musée de Lyon) [avec 1 planche]. 497-507 1,76 Bifao030_art_45.pdf  See also museum page from Lyon
Funerary cones of the First Prophet of Amun Ptahmose are in the collection of the Metropolitan Museum. The Scepter of Egypt II, by W. C. Hayes  pg.27 See also: Amenhotep III, by O’Conner and Cline (eds), pg.194, 202


Stela of Ptahmose, from Lyon.
This is a low gif image. See pdf file above for original.

Aperel from the time of Amenhotep III and Akhenaten
Northern Vizier. His tomb was discovered in 1987 by the French under supervision of A. Zivie. The tomb is  designated at I.1 and is located  in the cliffs of the Bubasteion  (a sanctuary dedicated to Bastet). Aperel was  Vizier, general of the Chariotry, and God's Father. Taweret, Aperia's wife,  may have been an important lady as  well considering the fact that she is the only New Kingdom woman to have been buried in a set of three coffins.  Their son Huy was buried in year 10 of Akhenaten or even later. Also mentioned in the tomb are Aperel’s sons Seny, a dignitary, and Hatiay, a priest.
According to Strouhal, Aperel was 50-60 years at the time of his death, his wife Taweret was 40-50 years at the time of her death, and their son Huy was 25-35 years at the time of his death.

Ramose from the time of Amenhotep III and Akhenaten
Southern Vizier. (TT55): Son of Heby (Overseer of the cattle of Amun in the Northern district) and Ipuya. His wife was named Meryet-Ptah. She was also his niece.  Ramose's brother was named Amenhotep. He was married to May, and the father of Meryet-Ptah.
Gordon argues that Ramose may have been Vizier of the North. His family connections put his background firmly in the region of Memphis.
Who Was the Southern Vizier during the Last Part of the Reign of Amenhotep III?, by Andrew Gordon Journal of Near Eastern Studies © 1989

Nakht(-pa-aten) from the time of Akhenaten
(Amarna Tomb 12) He was Hereditary prince, count, sealbearer, overseer of the city and vizier, overseer of the work projects in Akhet-Aten.

Pentu. from the time of Tutankhamen
Northern Vizier. An inscription mentioning the Vizier Pentu was found on a wine jar in Tutankhamen's tomb. Some speculate that Pentu the Vizier may be the same individual as Pentu the physician from the reign of Akhenaten, but this identification is not at all certain.

Aye from the time of Tutankhamen
Northern Vizier? Aye had the title of Vizier on a piece of gold foil found in a box in the Valley of the Queens.
This band of gold does not preserve Aye's name but the titles seem to indicate the gold foil had to mention Aye.
The titles are: Hereditary Prince and Mayor, Chancellor of the King of Lower Egypt, Vizier, Doer of Right and Priest of Maat.
The box in which this foil was found contained objects inscribed for Tutankhamen, Ankhesenamen and Aye.
King Ay, the Successor of Tut'ankhamūn, by Percy E. Newberry The Journal of Egyptian Archaeology © 1932

Usermontu. from the time of Tutankhamen (maybe Horemheb as well?)
Southern Vizier.  Usermontu is still mentioned in tombs dating to the time of Ramesses II.
Usermontu is depicted in the tomb of Khons, called To (TT31). Usermontu is said to be born of Maia. His father is not mentioned. Usermontu is also depicted in the tomb of the High Priest of Sobek, Hatiay (TT324) and in the tomb of Amenemope (TT 148) which dates to the time of Ramesses III.

Paramessu. from the time of Horemheb
Northern Vizier. Son of Seti. On the 400 year stela his title are given as: Prince regent, the mayor of the town, the vizier, the chief of the archers, the governor of the fortress of Tjarw, the royal scribe, the administrative officer of the chariotry.




19th and 20th Dynasty


Seti,  from the time of Ramesses I
Northern Vizier. Son of Ramesses I. On the 400 year stela his title are given as: The Regent, the mayor of the town, the vizier, the fanbearer on the right hand of the King, the leader of the bowmen, the chief of the archers, the governor of the fortress of Tjarw, the great of Medjay, the royal scribe, the administrative officer of the chariotry, the lord master of the ceremonies of the Feast of the He-goat, the master of Smendes, the first prophet of Seth, the lector-priest of Wadjet-Opet-Tawy, the head of all priests of all the gods.
He would later take the throne as Seti I. The stela records the name of his mother as Tiu, mistress of the house, the songstress of Re.
Murnane has suggested that it is possible that the Vizier Seti is not identical to the future Sety I.
(mentioned in  Ancient Egyptian Kingship - Page 195 by David B. O'Connor, David P. Silverman)

Nebamun from the time of Sety I
Northern Vizier. Nebamun is attested in the Memphite palace accounts early in Seti's reign.
(mentioned in  Ancient Egyptian Kingship - Page 195 by David B. O'Connor, David P. Silverman)
(mentiond in  The Monuments of Seti I: Epigraphic, Historical and Art Historical Analysis By Peter James Brand)


Hatiay from the time of Sety I 
Northern Vizier. Hatiay is known from an inscription at Giza. He is shown with Seti I adoring the Sphinx.

Paser from the time of Sety I and Ramesses II
 (TT106) Paser is a well known Vizier who lived on from Seti I's reign to the reign of  Ramses II. Son of Nebneteru Tenry (Chief Prophet of Amun) and Merytre (Chief of the Harem of Amun).;   Wife: Tiy (Chief of the Harem of Amun)
Vizier of the South. Paser has a long list of titles and here are a selection of his titles as recorded on several monuments: Mouth of Nekhen and Prophet of Truth (maat), Fanbearer on the Right of the King. Festival Leader of Amun. Ruler with the bat-sceptre in the mansion of Sekhmet. High Priest of “Great-of-Magic” (refers to Neith?). Chief of Secrets in the mansion of Neith.
Son of Nebneteru called Tenri, High Priest of Amun and sem-priest in the temple of Ptah and Merytre, Chief of the Harim of Amun. Grandson of Aniy and Naia (parents of Merytre)
Brother: Tatia, Steward of the temple of Maat.
Paser had monuments in Thebes (tomb), Pi-Ramesse, Tanis, Memphis, Abydos, Medamud.
(Kitchen, Ramesside Inscriptions, Volume III)

There is some confusion as to whom served as Vizier where.

Hatiay
from the time of Ramesses II
Northern Vizier. Continued from the reign of Seti I. See above.
Nebamun, Vizier. Son of Ramose and Sheritre. Listed as a 'brother' on a monument of the High priest of Osiris Wennufer. This means he was likely related to Rahotep I, and possibly (more distantly) to Rahotep II.
(Kitchen, Ramesside Inscriptions, Volume III)

(Pa)Rahotep (I) from the time of Ramesses II
Vizier (of the North) and said to be the son of the high priest of Osiris, To and Maianuy. Mentioned on a monument of the High Priest of Osiris, Wennufer as a 'brother' (could be a cousin instead)
(Kitchen, Ramesside Inscriptions, Volume III)

Ramessu Mentioned by Kitchen.

(Pa)Rahotep (II) from the time of Ramesses II
Northern Vizier. Fanbearer, High Priest of Re, High Priest of Ptah and Vizier (of the North). He was the son of the High Priest of Ptah Pahemneter. Listed as 'brother' of the High Priest of Anhur Minmose. Married to Huneroy, who was Chief of the Harim of Herishef, who was the daughter of Buia called Katnesu, Chief of the Harem of Anhur. Rahotep (II) may also have been a (distant) relative of Wennufer the High Priest of Osiris.
(Kitchen, Ramesside Inscriptions, Volume III)

Nehy from the time of Ramesses II
Vizier of the South. Mentioned by Kitchen.

Tuthmose from the time of Ramesses II
Vizier of the South. Mentioned by Kitchen.

Khay from the time of Ramesses II
Vizier of the South. Son of Troop Commander Hai and Chantress of Amun Nubemniut. His wife was called Yam.
(Kitchen, Ramesside Inscriptions, Volume III)

Neferrompet, from the time of Ramesses II
Vizier and High Priest of Ptah. Son of Neferronpet and Qafriati. Married to the Lady Mutpipu. His son Bakenptah was a God's Father. He seems to have had at least four daughters: Inuhayet, Taweret'khati, Reset, and Henutmeter.
(Kitchen, Ramesside Inscriptions, Volume III)

Hori, from the time of Merenptah, Sety II, Siptah, Tawosret, Sethnakht and Ramesses III
Northern Vizier. son of the High Priest of Ptah Hori, and hence a grand-son of Prince-Khaemwaset. He continued to serve until the time of Ramessses III. Known from several sources.
Reign of Siptah: A Hieroglyphic Ostracon in the Museum of Fine Arts at Boston, by Jaroslav Černý The Journal of Egyptian Archaeology © 1958

Panehesy.  from the time of Merenptah
Vizier of the South. The Vizier Panehesy is known from a chapel at the Speos at Gebel el-Silsila.

Messuy  from the time of Merenptah
Vizier of the South. Some think that Messuy became Pharaoh under the name Amenmesse. He was also Viceroy of Kush.

Amenmes. Served under both Sety II and Amenmesses in Upper Egypt.
Amenmes was a judge in the case of the workman Paneb vs. his colleague and step-father Neferhotep. Depicted in a chapel in Deir el-Medina with Amenmesse. Is said to have been removed by "Mose" (Nickname for Amenmesses?)
Amenmesse in Kent, Liverpool, and Thebes, by Aidan Dodson The Journal of Egyptian Archaeology © 199

Khaemteri. from the time of Amenmesse
The ex-viceroy of Kush was appointed Vizier by Amenmesse.

Pa-Ra-emheb from the time of Sety II
Replaces Khaemteri after Amenmesse dies. Pa-Ra-emheb himself is later replaced by the Northern Vizier Hori.


Bay from the time of Tawosret
Also known as Ramesses-Bay. MAy have already served under Siptah, but was mostly associated with Queen Tausert. Had a tomb prepared for himself in the Valley of the Kings (KV13) which was apparently never used.

Hewernef  from the time of Ramesses III
Vizier of the North. Attested in Year 15 in Deir el Medina. Seems to have succeeded Hori after his death.This Hewernef might well have been the anonymous northern vizier who is mentioned as having been ‘removed’ by Ramses III from a temple in Athribis (in Pap. Harris I) and who was succeeded by the vizier To in regnal year 29.

To   from the time of Ramesses III
Vizier of the South. Served as early as year 16 and was still in office as late as year 29. Known from a letter written by the scribe Neferhotep. A Letter of Complaint to the Vizier To, by Edward F. Wente Journal of Near Eastern Studies © 1961
See also:
A Prince's Tomb in the Valley of the Kings, by Edward F. Wente Journal of Near Eastern Studies © 1973

Nehy? from the time of Ramesses III (IV?)
Possibly a Vizier mentioned on blocks from Thebes. Appears in a scene with Ramesses III, Queen Isis and her mother Queen Hemdjeret? Possibly this is a scene depicting the installation of Isis as God's Wife, which would date this to the reign of Ramesses IV
Queen Ēse of the Twentieth Dynasty and Her Mother, by Jaroslav Černý The Journal of Egyptian Archaeology © 1958

Mentehetef (Montu-hir-hetef).  Vizier from the time of Ramesses IX
Father of the vizier Wennefer. Mentehetef and Wennefer are known from an inscription in the rear of the Monthu temple at Karnak.
Vizier Menteḥetef, by Jac. J. Janssen The Journal of Egyptian Archaeology © 1967

Wennefer
Vizier from the time of Ramesses IX
Son of Mentehetef. Mentehetef and Wennefer are known from an inscription in the rear of the Monthu temple at Karnak.
Mentioned in
Vizier Menteḥetef, by Jac. J. Janssen The Journal of Egyptian Archaeology © 1967

Nebmarenakht
also called Saht(a)-nefer.
from the time of Ramesses IX - Ramesses XI
A fragment was found with the name of Nebmarenakht
in TT293, the tomb of Ramessesnakht (High priest of Amun, Time of Rameses IV). Van Siclen states: "Nebmaatre-nakht/Saht(a)-nefer is attested as holding office for a minimum of 42 years (from year 7 of Ramses IX until year 2 of the Renaissance = year 20 of Ramses XI), and he would have been 60 (±4) years old at its end. The close of his career is uncertain." It seems that Nebmarenakht may have been temporarily replaced by the Vizier Khaemwaset, but was later reinstated.
The Supposed Revolution of the High-Priest Amenḥotpe under Ramesses IX, by T. Eric Peet
The Journal of Egyptian Archaeology © 1926

Khaemwaset. Vizier from the time of Ramesses IX
Khaemwaset may have replaced Nebmarenakht from year 14 to 17 of Ramesses IX.
The Supposed Revolution of the High-Priest Amenḥotpe under Ramesses IX, by T. Eric Peet The Journal of Egyptian Archaeology © 1926
(A History of Ancient Egypt By Nicolas-Christophe Grimal - pg 289)

Herihor  from the time of Ramesses XI
Served as High Priest of Amun and later as Vizier under Ramesses XI. His wife Nodjmet may have been a sister of Ramesses XI. Herihor and Smendes divided up the country between them.



Southern Viziers of Egypt through the 21st to 25th dynasty.

(Adapted from http://members.aol.com/Ian%20Wade/Waste/Viziers2.html)

21st dynasty
Herihor
, Southern Vizier, Ca 1075 BC.
Pinudjem I, Southern Vizier Vizier and Generalissimo. From year 16 of Nesibanebdjedet (Smendes) I he took on full Pharaonic titles. Son of Piankhi by Hereret. Father of Djedkhonsiufankh, Masaharta and Psusennes I. Wife: Isetemkheb II.
Amenhirpamesha, Southern Vizier. Possibly under Amenemnisu, Psusennes I, Amenemope? Probably also held the titles of 2nd, 3rd and 4th prophet of Amun. Ca. 1040 BC?
Neseramun (A) , Southern Vizier. Possibly under Siamun and Har-Psusennes II? Ca 960 BC. Neseramun was the son of a royal scribe named Nebneteru (ii). Neseramun married Muthetepi and was the father of the royal scribe Nebneteru (iii)



22nd dynasty
Padimut A Southern Vizier. Possibly under Shoshenq I. Ca 930 BC.
Ia-o Southern Vizier. Possibly under Shoshenq I and Osorkon I. Ca 900 BC. Ia-o's son, the Theban priest Hori, lists Ia-o's titles as Prophet of the temple of Amun, real royal scribe accompanying the King (Shoshenq I) at his incursions in the foreign land of Retenu.
Rudpamut Southern Vizier. Possibly under Takelot I. Ca 880 BC.
Hor[y]
Southern Vizier. Time of Takelot I or II (Year 14 is attested) Ca. 876 BC.
Hori son of Iutjek After Osorkon II ?
Pamiu, Southern Vizier. Time of Osorkon II? Ca. 865 BC
Pakharu, Southern Vizier. son of Pamiu Married Ir-Bast-udja-tjau, a daughter of Takeloth II or III. Time of Osorkon II and Takelot II? Ca 855 BC.
Pediamontet, Southern Vizier. son of Pamiu Time of Takelot II? Ca 845 BC.
Nesipaqashuty II, Southern Vizier. Married Di-Ese-nesyt, a daughter of Takeloth II or III. Nesipakashuty was a nephew of the Vizier Pediamonet. And hence also related to Pakharu, vizier and brother of Pediamonet. Ca 840 BC.
Nesipakashuty I, Southern Vizier. Takelot II?. Ca 835 BC.


23rd Dynasty
Harsiese D, Southern Vizier. Son of Nesipakashuty I Possibly under Takelot II Ca 825 BC.

Hor (XVIII)  Southern Vizier. Possibly under Takelot II Ca 820 BC.

Pentyefankh, Southern Vizier. son of Hor (XVIII) Attested in year 8 of Pedubast I(inducted as Vizier in that year.) Ca 815 BC.

Harkhebi, Southern Vizier. Ca 800 BC.
Harsiese (Hor-si-Aset) and Harkhebi (Hor-khebyet) are mentioned on a statue of Tja-en-waset, son of Har-si-Aset.
A Group of Egyptian Antiquities, by Ludlow Bull; H. E. Winlock The Metropolitan Museum of Art Bulletin © 1935

Harsiese (Har-si-Aset) (E)  Southern Vizier. Attested in year 39 of Shoshenq III . Son of Harkhebi. Ca 790 BC.
Harsiese (Hor-si-Aset) and Harkhebi (Hor-khebyet) are mentioned on a statue of Tja-en-waset, son of Har-si-Aset.
A Group of Egyptian Antiquities, by Ludlow Bull; H. E. Winlock The Metropolitan Museum of Art Bulletin © 1935

Djed-Khons-ef-ankh (E) Southern Vizier. Possibly under Takelot III Ca 780 BC.

Naktefmut (C) Southern Vizier. Time of Rudamun? Married Iset-weret, a daughter of Takelot II and a lady called Tairbast. Nakhtefmut was a son of Nebneteru (vi) and Neskhonspakhered. Ca 770 BC.

Hor (X), Southern Vizier. son of Naktefmut C and Tairbast (Contemporary of Osorkon III ?) Ca 760 BC.

Pami(u) Time of Shoshenq V?
Pami was the father of the Viziers Pediamonet and Pakharu, and the grand-father of the Vizier Nespakeshuty (son of Pediamonet). Pami's son Pakhuru and gran-son Nespakeshuty both married daughters of King Takelot III.
Two Osiris Figures of the Third Intermediate Period, by D. A. Aston The Journal of Egyptian Archaeology © 1991

Pakharu, son of Pamiu Married daughter of Takeloth III Time of Shoshenq V?

Ankh-Osorkon  Time of Shoshenq V?
Mentioned on the coffin of his grand-son Namenkhamun who was said to be the son of Ankhpakhered, son of Ankh-Osorkon, son of Djedptahefankh. Djedptahefankh is called the King's son of Osorkon and King's brother of Takelot.
Two Confusing Coffins, by M. L. Bierbrier The Journal of Egyptian Archaeology © 1984

Pediamontet, son of Pamiu Time of Shoshenq V?
Harsiese F Southern Vizier. Time of Shoshenq V? Son of Pediese, and father of the Viziers Nesmin A, Khamhor A and possibly Pediese. Possibly married to Babai? Ca 750 BC.
Nesmin I, Southern Vizier. Son of Harsiese F, Time of Shoshenq V? Ca 740 BC.
Ankh-Hor  Southern Vizier. †Contemporary of Piankhi Time of Shoshenq V? Ca 730 BC.
Nesipaqashuty II Married daughter of Takeloth III 725



24th Dynasty?
Pediese, Southern Vizier. Pediese was a son of the lady Babai. It's not clear if he was the son of the Vizier Harsiese F or a later Vizier Harsiese named Pahrer. Time of Bakenranef?
Khamhor A, Southern Vizier., son of Harsiese F. Father of the viziers Nesmin B and Pahrer. Also father of  Pediamun, the mayor of Thebes Neshptah and through him grandfather of the mayor of Thebes Montemhat (also 4th priest of Amun). Time of Bakenranef?

25th Dynasty?
Pahrer/Harsiese G, Southern Vizier, son of Khamhor A. Married to Djed-Mut-es-ankh
Nesmin II, II, Southern Vizier, son Khamhor A. Married to Tyetenese. Father of Khaemhor B and Nesamenope.
Nesipaqashuty III Southern Vizier, seems to have come from the area of Thinis.
Nespamedu A, Southern Vizier, son of Nesipaqashuty III. Married to Irterau, the Chief Attendant of the Divine Consort Nitocris. Nespamedu was buried in Thinis. His wife Irterau may have moved to Thebes with her son, the vizier Nespaqeshuty IV. She was buried in TT390.
Nespaqashuty IV, Southern Vizier. Son of Nespamedu.
Mentuhotp
, Northern Vizier
Harsiese, Northern Vizier to King Taharqa. Also High Priest of Re.
Djedkare, Northern Vizier




26th Dynasty

Sasobek, Northern Vizier
Nasekheperensekhmet
(Psamtek I), Northern Vizier
Bakenrenef, Northern vizier of Psamtek I, at Saqqara. Tomb was excavated in Saqqara.
Nespaqashuty IV
. (TT312) Son of the vizier Nespamedu and of Irterau (TT390) (Female scribe, Chief attendant of the Divine Adoratrix Nitocris). Nespaqeshuty was the third vizier from this family after his grandfather Nespaqeshuty III and his father Nespamedu. He was apparently the first of the family to be buried in Thebes. It seems that Nespaqeshuty was a contemporary of Harwa (TT37), Petamenophis (TT33) and Montuemhet (TT34). Nespaqeshuty was married to Ketykety. The tomb (TT312) was excavated in 1923 by Winlock and seems to have suffered greatly from a fire at some point.
Iry, Southern Vizier.
Djedwebasettiuefankh, Southern Vizier.
Gemenefhorbak, Northern Vizier
Harsomtusemhat, Northern Vizier
Psamtek-Meryneit (Amasis), Northern Vizier
Pasherientaihet (Amasis), Northern Vizier
Horsiese, Northern Vizier



Ptolemaic Period

Cleopatra I Syre, was the wife of Ptolemy V and the mother of Cleopatra II, Ptolemy VI and Ptolemy VIII.

Yuya Amenhotep was Vizier under Cleopatra VII

Horemheb (Weben-ra-empet) was also vizier under Cleopatra VII.




Information comes from:
  • Cyril Aldred: Two Theban Notables during the Later Reign of Amenophis III ; Journal of Near Eastern Studies Vol. 18, No. 2 (Apr., 1959), pp. 113-120
  • James P. Allen http://www.gizapyramids.org/pdf%20library/festschrift_simpson/01_allen.pdf
  • Breasted, Ancient Records
  • Dodson/Hilton, Royal Genealogies.
  • Kitchen, Pharaoh Triumphant.
  • Kitchen, Ramesside Inscriptions, Volume III
  • Strouhal, Eugène, L'étude anthropologique et paléopathologique des restes du vizir 'Aper-El et de sa famille: premiers résultats, BSFE 126 (Mars 1993), 24-37. (pl.).
  • Vandersleyen, L'Egypte et la vallée du Nil, vol. 2(via http://egyptologist.org/discus/messages/24/2641.html?1009646339)
  • Van Siclen III, Charles C., A Stela from Toulouse Re-examined, in: For His Ka. Essays Baer, 267-270.
  • http://www.digitalegypt.ucl.ac.uk/administration/viziers.html


Thanks to Rozette for some of the information :D.





















Comments: email barta@slu.edu